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Published : June 14, 2017 | Author : sanjeevnanda
Category : Miscellaneous | Total Views : 474 | Rating :

  
sanjeevnanda
I am Sanjeev Nanda, A law student of MDSU. I do research on labour law and human rights.
 

An In-Depth Look at ‘Supply’ under the Central Goods and Services Tax (CGST) Act

Under the Goods and Services Tax (GST), supply happens to be the taxable event under intra/inter state transfer of either goods and/or services.

A Definition of Supply under CGST Act 2017

Supply consists of –
(a) all forms of supply of goods or services or both such as sale, transfer, barter, exchange, license, rental, lease or disposal made or agreed to be made for a consideration by a person in the course or furtherance of business,

(b) Import of services, for a consideration whether or not in the course or furtherance of business, and

(c) A supply specified in Schedule I, made or agreed to be made without a consideration.

(d) Activities to be treated as supply of goods or supply of services as referred to in Schedule II.

(2) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-section (1) –
(a) Activities or transactions specified in Schedule III; or

(b) such activities or transactions undertaken by the Central Government, a State Government or any local authority in which they are engaged as public authorities, as may be notified by the Government on the recommendations of the Council, Shall be treated neither as a supply of goods nor a supply of services.

(3) Subject to the provisions of sub-sections (1) and (2), the Government may, on the recommendations of the Council, specify, by notification, the transactions that are to be treated as –
(a) A supply of goods and not as a supply of services; or

(b) A supply of services and not as a supply of goods.

“goods’’ means every kind of movable property other than money and securities but includes actionable claim, growing crops, grass and things attached to or forming part of the land which are agreed to be severed before supply or under a contract of supply;

“services’’ means anything other than goods, money and securities but includes activities relating to the use of money or its conversion by cash or by any other mode, from one form, currency or denomination, to another form, currency or denomination for which a separate consideration is charged;

Schedule I – Matters to be treated as supply even if made without consideration

1. Permanent transfer/disposal of business assets where input tax credit has been availed on such assets.

2. Supply of goods or services between related persons, or between distinct persons as specified in section 25, when made in the course or furtherance of business.
Exception: Gifts not exceeding Rs. 50,000 in value in a financial year by an employer to an employee shall not be treated as supply of goods or services or both.

3. Supply of goods –
(a) By a principal to his agent where the agent undertakes to supply such goods on behalf of the principal, or

(b) By an agent to his principal where the agent undertakes to receive such goods on behalf of the principal.

4. Import of services by a taxable person from a related person or from any of his other establishments outside India, in the course or furtherance of business.
Persons shall be deemed to be “related persons’’ if –

a) Such persons are officers or directors of one another’s businesses;

b) Such persons are legally recognized partners in business;

c) Such persons are employer and employee;

d) any person directly or indirectly owns, controls or holds 25% or more of the outstanding voting stock or shares of both of them;

e) One of them directly or indirectly controls the other;

f) Both of them are directly or indirectly controlled by a third person;

g) Together they directly or indirectly control a third person; or

h) They are members of the same family;

Sole Agents are deemed to be related – Persons who are associated in the business of one another in that one is the sole agent or sole distributor or sole concessionaire, howsoever described, of the other, shall be deemed to be related.

Schedule 11 – Matters to be treated as supply of goods or services

1. Transfer
(a) Any transfer of the title in goods is a supply of goods.

(b) Any transfer of goods or of right in goods or of undivided share in goods without the transfer of title thereof, is a supply of services.

(c) Any transfer of title in goods under an agreement which stipulates that property in goods will pass at a future date upon payment of full consideration as agreed, is a supply of goods.

2. Land and Building
(a) Any lease, tenancy, easement, license to occupy land is a supply of services.

(b) Any lease or letting out of the building including a commercial, industrial or residential complex for business or commerce, either wholly or partly, is a supply of services.

3. Treatment or process
Any treatment or process which is being applied to another person’s goods is a supply of services.

4. Transfer of business assets
(a) Where goods forming part of the assets of a business are transferred or disposed of by or under the directions of the person carrying on the business so as no longer to form part of those assets, whether or not for a consideration, such transfer or disposal is a supply of goods by the person.

(b) Where, by or under the direction of a person carrying on a business, goods held or used for the purposes of the business are put to any private use or are used, or made available to any person for use, for any purpose other than a purpose of the business, whether or not for a consideration, the usage or making available of such goods is a supply of services.

(c) Where any person ceases to be a taxable person, any goods forming part of the assets of any business carried on by him shall be deemed to be supplied by him in the course or furtherance of his business immediately before he ceases to be a taxable person, unless—

(i) The business is transferred as a going concern (TAGC) to another person; or

(ii) The business is carried on by a personal representative who is deemed to be a taxable person.

5. The following shall be treated as “supply of service”
(a) Renting of immovable property;

(b) Construction of a complex, building, civil structure or a part thereof, including a complex or building intended for sale to a buyer, wholly or partly, except where the entire consideration has been received after issuance of completion certificate, where required, by the competent authority or before its first occupation, whichever is earlier.

(c) Temporary transfer or permitting the use or enjoyment of any intellectual property right;

(d) Development, design, programming, customization, adaptation, up gradation, enhancement, implementation of information technology software;

(e) Agreeing to the obligation to refrain from an act, or to tolerate an act or a situation, or to do an act;

(f) Transfer of the right to use any goods for any purpose (whether or not for a specified period) for cash, deferred payment or other valuable consideration

6. Composite supply
The following composite supplies shall be treated as a supply of services, namely –

(a) Works contract as defined in clause (119) of section 2; and

(b) Supply, by way of or as part of any service or in any other manner whatsoever, of goods, being food or any other article for human consumption or any drink (other than alcoholic liquor for human consumption), where such supply or service is for cash, deferred payment or other valuable consideration.

7. The following shall be treated as supply of goods
(a) Supply of goods by any unincorporated association or body of persons to a member thereof for cash, deferred payment or other valuable consideration.

Schedule 111– Activities or transactions which shall be treated neither as a supply of goods nor a supply of services

1. Services by an employee to the employer in the course of or in relation to his employment.

2. Services by any Court or Tribunal established under any law for the time being in force.

3.(a) The functions performed by the Members of Parliament, Members of State Legislature, Members of Panchayats, Members of Municipalities and Members of other local authorities;

(b) The duties performed by any person who holds any post in pursuance of the provisions of the Constitution in that capacity; or

(c) The duties performed by any person as a Chairperson or a Member or a Director in a body established by the Central Government or a State Government or local authority and who is not deemed as an employee before the commencement of this clause.

4. Services of funeral, burial, crematorium or mortuary including transportation of the deceased.

5. Sale of land and, subject to clause (b) of paragraph 5 of Schedule II, sale of building.

6. Actionable claims, other than lottery, betting and gambling.

Explanation – For the purposes of paragraph 2, the term “court” includes District Court, High Court and Supreme Court.

 




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